Olesea Gliga

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THE CONTENT OF HEAVY METALS IN THE BEES BODY DEPENDING ON LOCATION AREA OF HIVES

Olesea Gliga

Abstract
    The aim of this paper was to determine residues of heavy metals such as Pb, Cd and Cu in the bees body in different areas with different human impact. For this, have been selected 4 research areas (forest area, agricultural area, transport area and industrial area) where have been placed each 12 bees families. The forest area served as control where, practically, lacked sources of pollution. In the agricultural area the main sources of pollution are vehicles from nearby auto route, the former deposit of pesticides and agricultural machinery. The transport area is located at the periphery of the city and is, one, affected by smoke gases from road transport. Also, at the periphery of the city is located the industrial area with impact of road transport, and industry. In the period 2012-2013 in May and June, from each family have been collected by 50 worker bees. The quantitative analysis of studied metals in the bees body have been performed using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry with thermal atomization (GFASS). It was found, that the honey bee responds to environmental changes, by variation of Pb, Cd and Cu concentrations in her body in dependence on bee families location. Among the studied metals, the highest concentrations in all research areas in the bees body record Cu, followed by Pb and Cd. The average concentrations of Pb in the bees body from the industrial and the transport areas have been significantly higher compared with those from forest area, respectively with 0,797 mg/kg or 402,5% (td = 7,73; P < 0,001) and 0,666 mg/kg or 336,4% (td = 8,12; P < 0,001). The average content of Cd in the bees body from industrial and transport areas, have been significantly higher compared with those from the forest area, respectively with 0,157 mg/kg or 413,2 % (td = 6,04; P < 0,001) and 0,089 mg or 234,2% (td = 8,09; P < 0,001). The average content of Cu in the bees body from the agricultural areas was significantly higher than those from forest area with 3,52 mg/kg or 81,8% (td = 10,66; P < 0,001). In all research areas, the heavy metals concentrations in the bees body have been far away and much lower than the noxious dose for bees.

Key words: bees body, heavy metals, lead, cadmium, copper